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Tips For Choosing The Right Hidden Camera

Once you have decided to install a hidden camera at your home, business or warehouse, it’s important to choose one with the right features and capabilities for your specific application.

 

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Here are a few things to consider:

  • Be sure to choose a hidden camera that blends well into your environment
    • Consider where you are going to be having the camera installed.  Be sure to choose a concealment that won’t attract suspicion.
  • Be sure to capture the level of detail you are looking for
    • In order to produce detailed video that provides facial identification, you need a hidden camera that produces high-resolution images.
    • Are you going to place the hidden camera outside?  If so be sure that your camera has outdoor day/night capabilities.
  • Be sure to select the right video recording solution
    • If you want to record video with your hidden camera, there are several options:
      • Connect your hidden camera to a compatible security system DVR for recording video
      • You can have  a separate DVR or micro DVR that is compatible with the hidden camera
      • You can have a hidden camera with a built-in DVR

Some of our most popular hidden cameras are:

  • Clocks
  • Smoke Detectors
  • Books
  • Binders
  • Pencil Sharpeners
  • Motion Detectors
  • Ceiling Speakers
  • Alarm Clocks
  • Thermostats

 

For more information on Hidden/Covert Security Cameras check out our website or contact our office at (937) 262-7937 today!

 

Book with Hidden Camera

smoke detector hidden camera

How to dispose of your old smoke alarm

The two types of residential smoke alarms that are most commonly used in the United States are ionization and photoelectric. Photoelectric-type smoke alarms contain a very tiny amount of radioactive material.  Combination smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors, also contain a very tiny amount of radioactive material.  Although some state regulations allow you to simply throw these smoke alarms in the trash, you will still need to remove the batteries from the alarm.

How to tell if your smoke detector contains radioactive material: 

If a smoke detector contains radioactive material, it is required by law to have a warning label on the body of the smoke detector.  The label is usually located at the “top” of the detector, facing the mounting base that attaches to the ceiling or wall.  Remove the smoke detector from its base, and look at the label.  A typical label might read:

This product is designed to detect products of combustion using ionization technology.  It contains 0.9 microcurie of Americium 241, a radioactive material

The label may have the international symbol for radiation on the label.

International Radiation Symbol

If a smoke detector does not include either the warning or the radiation symbol on the label, and if there is no evidence that the label has been removed or destroyed, it is safe to assume that the device does not contain any radioactive material.  If the label has been removed or destroyed, it is best to treat the device as if it is an ionization unit, and dispose of it as described below.

Here are the three ways to dispose of your smoke alarms:

  1. If allowed in your area, remove the batteries and wrap the unit in newspaper.  You then are able to throw the smoke alarm in the trash.*
  2. If accepted in your area, take to a local Recycling Center, or take to a Hazardous Material Waste Center.*
  3. Ionization smoke alarms and combination smoke alarms can be sent back to the manufacturer.  They have the proper equipment to safely dispose of the smoke alarms.
*Please check with state or local municipal or household hazardous waste authorities. 
Caution: Ionization smoke alarms should never be opened.  If you are unable to get the batteries out of the alarm without opening it, please use option 2 or 3.

For more information on the proper disposal of smoke alarms please refer to one of the sites below or check with your state or local authorities.

U.S. Fire Administration

EPA

smoke alarm detector

 
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